Black History Month: Georgia Douglas Johnson’s “The Riddle”

For the 12th day of Black History Month, I will recite a poem written by Georgia Douglass Johnson entitled “The Riddle”. This poem was included in Alain Locke’s anthology “The New Negro” which was a compilation of literature written during the New Negro Movement better known as the Harlem Renaissance. Georgia Douglass Johnson was an…

Tulsa Riot of 1921: The Destruction of Black Wall Street

Today marks the 95th anniversary of the Tulsa Riot of 1921 and the destruction of many homes and businesses in the Greenwood district (also referred to as “Little Africa” and “Black Wall Street”) of Tulsa, Oklahoma. In the early 1920’s, Tulsa was wealthy on account of an oil discovery; and because of this, the Greenwood…

Discourse on Africana Womanism

About a month ago, I came across an interesting video of two incredible scholars, Dr. Clenora Hudson-Weems and Dr. Barbara Christian (may she rest in peace), presenting their personal ideology regarding the Black women and the womanist/feminist theory. In this video, Dr. Christian explains that while she is not committed to any one term defining…

Being African-American and Lactose Intolerant

Over 70 percent of the world’s population is unable to produce lactase[i] which is an enzyme that breaks down lactose[ii] for digestion.[1] Lactase is produced in the small intestines where it simplifies lactose allowing it to be absorbed into the bloodstream. With that said, the deficiency of lactase and the malabsorption of lactose may lead…

Interview with RaShaad Mos: MCee from South Dallas

Throughout my lifetime I’ve been lucky to meet some of the most intriguing, inspiring people. Most of which are unaware of how much their dreams and achievements inspire those around them… myself included.  RaShaad Mos is an intelligent, talented, young MCee from South Dallas who writes and performs his own music. He just released a…

Africentriguing Presents: Artistik stylinz of Dzosa Nkolo-Kangkolo

Black history is not stagnant. Black people, Black culture, and Black history are extremely dynamic; it move and grooves as we do. As a people, we should remain strong and proud. As we work to eliminate that in which hinders our progression, we must look back and reminisce on the struggle and hardship our ancestors overcame. With that…

Fela Kuti and the Rise of Afrobeats

You absolutely cannot introduce Afrobeats without discussing its king, Fela Kuti. Yes, this vivacious brotha is music royalty! His music embodied the soul of the Black power, anti-Colonial, and Pan-African movements of the 1960’s and 1970’s and is still well played today among diverse populations. Olufela Olusegun Oludotun Ransome-Kuti was born October 15, 1938 in…

Dr. Boyce: No Independence Day For Black People

Some people are devoted to the distorted euphoria of being apart of something bigger than themselves and false nationalism brought on by the observance of this holiday … illusive patriotism.